Florida american daily news

Tomorrow’s newspaper in Florida  is a very different beast! With the increasing availability of instant news and information 24/7, the ‘news’ part of newspapers is rapidly morphing. If I want to know who did what when or what today’s big issue is, whether that be globally, nationally or locally, I have a seemingly unlimited choice of instant news services from which to choose. Even my old mobile phone grants me immediate internet access, meaning keeping up with the Jones’s has never been easier.

So why do we still have newspapers in Florida ? Everyone knows that circulation is plummeting, but a few of us die-hards believe there will always be print. Why? Because it is comfortable. The Y-Gens are still buying their magazines and books because they also enjoy that relaxing slump on the couch with a drink, snacks and an engaging read. The operative word here of course is engaging!

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It's hard to imagine a time before television news and radio news, not to mention news on the Internet, but during the Civil War, citizens had to rely on two major sources of news - word of mouth and newspapers.

Although word of mouth was the most expedient source of news about the war, newspapers provided citizens and soldiers alike with the most detailed accounts of war that that had ever been published in America or in any other country for that matter. New printing technologies allowed newspapers and magazines alike to publish another new technology - photographs. The advent of the telegraph made news from the front lines of the war available to the press room in minutes rather than days or weeks. Newspapers provided a tangible account of a war that developed by the day.

By the time the Civil War began in 1860, newspapers had expanded from the large cities in the northeast to almost all major cities throughout the United States, and even into some smaller towns, where an enterprising publisher could set up a press.

However, at the outset of the war, most newspapers were still yet unequipped to cover the war. Not only was the Civil War one of the most geographically large wars fought to the time, but the sheer numbers of those involved made the task mind-boggling. Although most of the larger papers, such as The New York Herald, The New York Times and Harper's Weekly had Washington correspondents, few had ever employed correspondents for the wide expanse of country the war encompassed. Thus a new position in the American newspaper office was born - the war correspondent.

War correspondents were sent out to the front lines, along with special artists, who until photographs became widely used toward the end of the war, sketched the action. These brave writers and artists experienced the same harsh conditions of life in a military camp as the soldiers did.

The ability of newspapers to get information from the front lines was often troubling for officers and others in positions of authority during the war. At various times, newspapers were censored for fear that the news they reported would be used by the enemy to advance their cause. This was more a problem in the North than in the South for obvious reasons - the South had had fewer major newspapers before the war, and blockades had resulted in such a shortage of paper, ink, and other supplies necessary that many papers shut down, never to reopen. But in the North, the threat of the press was taken in hand; Lincoln himself feared the repercussions of newspapers that were either opposed to the war or sympathetic to the Confederate cause, and suppressed many of these papers.

But Lincoln's courting of editors that supported his cause sometimes came back to haunt him, as is the case of his supporter Horace Greeley, of the New York Tribune, whom, in an effort to stir up support for the Union, undoubtedly contributed to the battles at Bull Run, which were both notorious losses for the Federal Army.

By far the most popular newspaper during the Civil War era was Harper's Weekly. Harper's was one of the more even-handed newspapers, due mostly to its popularity in the South. Although the paper supported Lincoln and the Union, it still reported with disinterest, and remained a mainstay of the Southern household during the war.

Aside from its impartiality, Harper's circulation of more than 200,000 during the Civil War era is attributable to the fact that the paper employed some of the most distinguished writers and artists of the time. Political cartoonist Thomas Nast was a mainstay of Harper's, as was artist Winslow Homer. Other notable artists who contributed to Harper's during the Civil War era include Theodore R. Davis, Henry Mosler, and the brothers Alfred Waud and William Waud.

Newspapers were the most reliable source of news during Civil War America. While newspapers served the citizens of the time well, they are also an invaluable resource for historians who study the war, providing insight not only into the actions of the war, but into the popular opinion of the war, as well.

Writing a News Feature Story

Newspaper inserts are a cost-effective and guaranteed way to have your flyers delivered directly into the homes of your potential customers. Advertising with full color flyers is a time-tested and proven method of marketing that can generate immediate sales and help your company with branding.

What is a newspaper insert?

A newspaper insert is simply a flyer that is distributed into homes or news stands via the newspaper. Once your flyer is placed into it becomes a "newspaper insert" which is also commonly referred to as a preprint, P&D, and/or Free Standing Insert (FSI).

Do you have an effective newspaper insert?

Before you even think about inserting your flyer into the newspaper you will want to make sure you have a great design. Here are a few things to consider when designing a newspaper insert for your small business.

  • Do you have attractive graphics and an overall high quality flyer?
  • Do you have a "call to action" such as a sale, promotion, or special event?
  • Have you included (easy to find) contact information?
  • Does your flyer stand out from the competition?
  • Do you have a way to track results such as a coupon or phone line?
  • Have you had a professional designer create or review your flyer?
You should answer yes to all of these questions before sending out your flyer.

What are the benefits of newspaper inserts?

  • More cost effective than direct mail, shared mail, radio, and television.
  • Guaranteed delivery into thousands of homes.
  • Targeted by zip code and demographics.
  • Generate instant responses and sales.
  • Time-tested method of marketing that yield great results.
  • Lends credibility to your business and build your brand.
  • Newspapers are a trusted source of information in your community.
  • Newspaper inserts typically remain in homes for 2-3 days after delivery
  • ....and the list could go on!

Don't throw away your small business advertising dollars. They are a smart, safe, and cost-effective way to launch a successful advertising campaign within your community.

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